New Sci-Fi Series To Examine Implications Of Modern Technology, ‘Awesome’ Sex Robots

The series presents a bold new take on the possible consequences of a technologically-dependent society, as well as some sexy metal humanoids.

The series presents a bold new take on the possible consequences of a technologically-dependent society, as well as some sexy metal humanoids.

In an intellectually provocative, philosophical and gratuitously sexual addition to their Sunday lineup, HBO announced the premiere of Greyworld, a science fiction drama that takes place in a near future society where the advancement of technology has led to dark consequences, as well as some hot, human-on-robot action.

Greyworld presents a dystopian world where our selfie-obsessed, technology-oriented culture has led to unimaginable consequences,” read an HBO press release. “[Greyworld] creates a fascinating, haunting universe where tech has gone awry and sex robots have gone buckwild.”

Each episode reportedly features a self-contained plot line in which characters deal with the consequences of futuristic technology, such as mental augmentation implants, virtual reality, or impressively realistic robot dick.

“We’re really trying to bend the rules here while staying true to the original novel,” said Gladstone. “Our main twist is the addition of hyper-realistic artificial-intelligence coitus.”

The series has already released its first four episodes to TV critics, many of whom have praised the program for its critical and unflinching gaze at the consequences of unchecked technological growth and how awesome it would be if sex robots were real.

Greyworld is endlessly thought-provoking,” writes Vulture critic Tevin Davis. “What happens when we can save a copy of our consciousness on a computer? Or when we give companies free reign over our personal information to make our lives easier? And how cool would it be to have sex robots who will cuddle for as long as I want without turning on the TV?”

HBO has already renewed the series for a second season, citing critics’ engagement and unabashed voyeurism.

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